WHY IS HEMP THE MOST SUSTAINABLE?

Hemp fabric functions better than plastic, paper and anything synthetic, can be used everyday for 20 years without falling apart and is the most sustainable fiber we know of.  It’s the most sustainable because it grows very quickly (like a weed), requires no pesticide/herbicides, needs little water, replenishes nutrients in the soil and drastically (especially drastic in comparison to plastic, paper and synthetics) REDUCES resource consumption (water, energy, trees), toxic pollution from chemicals and land/ocean devastation created from plastic, paper and synthetic bags.

NO PESTICIDES, HERBICIDES, OR FUNGACIDES

Hemp grows vigorously and requires no pesticides, herbicides or fungicides due to it’s own production of natural resins and dense growth pattern. It’s relative, marijuana is sometimes called “Weed” which seems appropriate since hemp does seem to grow like a weed: faster, stronger, and without room in between plants for any other weeds.

DROUGHT TOLERANT

Rainfall is adequate to support the hemp crop, so it needs little to no irrigation and will grow in arid regions. If mechanical retting is used, it does require a lot of water. Most of the water requirements for hemp are in the processing of the fibers, not the growing of the plant. If traditional retting is used, where the stalks are left in the fields to be rained on, no extra water is used. All fibers, synthetic and natural alike require water.

CAN SAVE PRECIOUS TREES

Hemp is fast growing and yields three to four times annually (every 100 days).

Hemp produces 4-10 times more fiber than trees per acre.  Hemp produces twice the amount of fiber as cotton and six times that of flax per acre .

GOOD FOR THE SOIL

Hemp adds nutrients to the soil, removes toxins, aerates the soil and prevents soil erosion with it’s long roots.  Hemp actually leaves the soil in better condition than before it was planted. This is currently being acknowledged by the U.S. congress and industrial hemp is becoming legal in the U.S. again.

IS HEMP LEGAL TO GROW IN THE USA NOW?

Yes and Yay! A few states including Colorado have now legalized growing industrial Hemp! The business of growing, processing, manufacturing and investing in hemp is taking off which means it will provide a huge boon to the economy and can become even more sustainable, local and cost effective!

CAN FARMERS PROFIT FROM GROWING HEMP?

Hemp is less expensive to farm because of its minimal growth requirements. Canadian hemp seed farmers are earning 10 times the revenue per acre than American grain farmers.

WHY USE HEMP FOR FOOD BAGS?

Hemp has the qualities we want in a food bag: Sustainable, Breathable, Absorbent, Anti-Microbial, extremely Durable AND as Natural as the Food we are Eating!!!

CAN HEMP REALLY BE USED FOR A TON OF USES?

One example is pictured here: Compressed thermal insulating hemp fiber panels close up view – building plan background

Yes, here’s a short list of Hemp’s many uses:

Cloth (textiles)

Paper and TP

Bio-degradable plastic

Construction/Building materials

Car Parts

Fuel

Food

Nutritional Supplements

Medicines

Animal bedding

Construction and Roofs

Bodycare products (the best)

Livestock feed

 

WHY USE HEMP  vs. TREES for PAPER?

The Library of Congress found that, “While the hemp paper in volumes 300-400 years old is still strong, 97% of the books, printed between 1900 and 1937 on tree paper, will be useable for less than 50 years.” Hemp paper can be recycled 7 to 8 times, compared with only 3-5 times for wood pulp paper.

The USDA reported in 1916 that an acre of hemp produced as much paper as four acres of trees annually , yet 70% of American forest have been destroyed since 1916.

Making paper from trees is kind of a joke, because trees are made up of only 30% cellulose. The other 70% of the tree must be removed using toxic chemicals, until the cellulose can be formed into paper. The higher the percentage of cellulose in a plant, the better, because fewer chemicals need to be used, and less work needs to be done before the paper can be made. Almost any plant in nature with a strong stalk is better suited to make paper than trees, especially hemp because it can be 85% cellulose.

Hemp makes paper stronger and lasts centuries longer than wood paper, which could be very valuable for people who want to keep written records. Hemp paper does not yellow, crack, or otherwise deteriorate like tree paper does. The acids which are needed for wood paper eventually eat away at the pulp and cause it to turn yellow and fall apart. Because of this publishers, libraries, and archives have to order specially processed acid free paper, but they could just buy hemp paper which already meets their quality standards.

Hemp paper also does not require any bleaching and so does not poison the water with dioxins or chlorine like tree paper mills do. The chemicals involved in making hemp paper are much less toxic, in fact, both paper made from hemp hurd and from the long bast fiber can be made without any chemicals at all, but it takes longer to separate the fiber from the lignin. Making paper from hemp could also eliminate erosion due to logging, reduces topsoil loss, and water pollution caused by soil runoff.